UDP Part 2 - Chapter 12: Standards - Standard S13 Protection of Existing Residential Amenities

UDP Part 2 - Chapter 12: Standards - Standard S13 Protection of Existing Residential Amenities

Standard S13 Protection of Existing Residential Amenities

Select from the following policies:

S13.1 Loss of Outlook

It is commonly held that loss of view is not a material consideration in assessing the acceptability of built development, including extensions. However a building's proximity can have an overbearing and dominating effect detrimental to the enjoyment by adjoining residential occupiers of their properties. Although it is dependent upon the proximity and scale of the proposed development a general standard can be adopted by reference to a line produced at an angle of 45 degrees from a point 2 metres above the adjoining ground level of the boundaries of the site where it adjoins residential properties. However, on sites that adjoin residential properties that have rear gardens of less than 9 metres in length this line should be produced at 45 degrees from a point at ground level on the boundary of the site where it adjoins residential properties. If any part of the proposed building extends beyond these lines then on-site judgement will be a determining factor in assessing the effect which the extension will have on the existing amenities of neighbouring properties (see Figures 12.5 and 12.5a)

Figure 12.5 Loss of outlook

Figure 12.5a Loss of outlook


S13.2 Loss of Privacy

The proximity of new development can result in the overlooking of existing residential properties either from windows or roof terraces/balconies. New windows should normally be positioned so that the distance to any residential windows is not less than 18 metres as measured by an arc of 60 degrees taken from the centre of the proposed new window. If this standard cannot be met then windows should be designed to ensure that no loss of privacy will occur (see Figure 12.6). A roof terrace/balcony can cause a considerable loss of privacy dependent upon its size and location. Generally a roof terrace/balcony is unacceptable if it would result in an additional opportunity for overlooking or result in a significantly greater degree of overlooking and consequent loss of privacy than from the access point onto the proposed roof terrace/balcony. 

FIgure 12.6 Loss of privacy

S13.2A Noise and Disturbance from Roof Terraces and Balconies

Planning permission will not be granted for roof terraces or balconies if the use of the terraces or balcony is likely to cause harm to the existing amenities of neighbouring occupiers by reason of noise and disturbance

S13.3 Aspect

No dwelling should have all its habitable room (Glossary) windows facing exclusively in any northerly direction (i.e. between north east and north west). Only where very special circumstances can be shown to exist which would outweigh the benefits to the amenity of the dwelling, will this requirement be relaxed. 
 

Page last updated: 02/02/2010